NetworkComms.Net seamlessly supports both TCP and UDP IP transport protocols. An extensive discussion of scenarios where each type might be preferable can be found here.

You can easily choose between the different transport protocols when creating connections:

//Create a connectionInfo object 
ConnectionInfo connInfo = new ConnectionInfo("192.168.0.1", 10000);

//Create a new TCP connection using default options
//A connection is returned via a static method instead of 
//   using a new operator to ensure thread safety
Connection newTCPConn = TCPConnection.GetConnection(connInfo);

//Create a new UDP connection using default options
//The parameter UDPOptions is for future "reliable" UDP features (currently unused).
Connection newUDPConn = UDPConnection.GetConnection(connInfo, UDPOptions.None);

For more information on these specific methods please see TCPConnection.GetConnection and UDPConnection.GetConnection. Once a connection has been created it can be used in a large number of ways, for a full reference see our online API here, regardless of the connection type used:

//////////////////////////////////////////
//Here are some common connection usages
//////////////////////////////////////////

//Append a connection specific packet handler
//We will trigger the method "MethodToRunForStringMessage" 
//  when a packet of type "StringMessage" is recieved
newConn.AppendIncomingPacketHandler<string>("StringMessage", 
    MethodToRunForStringMessage, 
    NetworkComms.DefaultSendReceiveOptions);

//Append a connection specific close handler
//We will trigger the method "MethodToRunOnConnectionClose"
//  if this connection is closed / disconnected.
newConn.AppendShutdownHandler(MethodToRunOnConnectionClose);

//Send a customObject using a packet of type "CustomObject1"
newConn.SendObject("CustomObject1", customObject);

//Send a customObject using a packet of type "CustomObject1" and
//   then wait synchronously for the remote end to return a 
//   CustomObject2 using a packet of type "CustomObject2"
CustomObject2 customObject2 = newConn.SendReceiveObject<CustomObject1, CustomObject2>("CustomObject1", 
    "CustomObject2", 
    1000, 
    customObject);

//Close the connection, triggering any close handlers
newConn.CloseConnection(false);

We have a tutorial further discussing the synchronous send receive methodology here and UDP specific features such as broadcasting here. If you have any questions regarding connections please feel free to leave a comment or post on our forums.